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20121225
20121225
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the most important things of all. thanks for joining us. we'll see you next time. [applause] (male announcer) live from the kron 4 news station, this is the kron 4 news. >> good morning on this christmas. we are taking a live look outside at the golden gate bridge. the bay area is gearing up for another round of storms. we'll be checking in with anny who has a look at our forecast in just a few minutes. but first. it will be a white christmas in many states as powerful winter storms move across the country. that could lead to travel delays on the ground and in the air. ed payne has the story. >> the flight crews run out ins door road crews-ahead of the expected christmas storm appeared similar, in oklahoma, where the will rogers airport flights have been cancelled. mark clayton burke >> when we start clearing this, it is typically a rule crew o 9-12 people to live with the use a high- tech survey crew that makes sure that the ice is going to be safe. the mice can be difficult to teach. >> spring killed, missouri are preparing for the storm that could dump 8-inches. salt-truck is ex
joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would go home and it was a completely untraditional lifestyle as farm laborers, my brother and myself. my sisters had a different experience. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >>
has really frustrated a long-time resident. kron 4's justine waldman shows us the mudslide and what is being done to fix it. >> reporter: as soon as it started to rain victor husary knew this was going to happen. that is why he got out his cell phone and took this video of a mudslide on castro ranch road. >> nobody wants to listen to victor. >> reporter: flooding left the two lane street, down to one lane. victor doesn't like how cars have to drive in the opposite lane of traffic. >> i have seen it for at least 15 years. people do not know which way to go. it is very dangerous. >> for a 600 families. >> reporter: victor says the problem starts on top of the hill. he claims improper drainage allows water and mud to cascade down causing all this mess. even these wooded barricades can't hold back the damage. that is why he made this video, so people can see what's happening here. he's reached out to the city which promised to fix the problem. >> look at that!, danger. most of that city supervisors told me that they were working on it. however, they are going to continue to work. >> rep
and friend so i decided to use my time at sea to read a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules byrnes of around the world in 80 days first published in the newspaper serial in 1872. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on on the ship i slowly made my way to the book. by french was good enough to my surprise but i actually enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated its period details especially the nature of the protagonists they englishman racing around the world. and has remarked offhandedly travel services at could take a person round the globe in a period of 80 days. prove that he challenged him and he is off. that 80 day measure was only conceivable by the late 19th century and the age of sales getting sails getting around the world have taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship would have -- it was the invention of steam power but the creation of regimented european empires around the globe, the opening of the suez canal and the emergence of commercial travel services that together made it just possible by the 18 70's t
. also with us anne hathaway. she brings new grit and passion to the role of the tragic heroine and hugh jack mann jean valjean. i'm pleased to have all of them back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> how hard is it to take this kind of play and put it into a musical, this kind of musical and put it on filmlmlm >> it is extremely hard. what makes it hard is you are starting on a journey with a musical that 60 million people have seen but so many people hold so close to their hearts. and i realize people have a kind of protective and proprietorial attitude toward the musical. so i had to study what it is that people feel protective about. and why is it people go back and back to this musical. and i became convinced it's because the musical offers the people the opportunity to reexperience these strong emotions time and again. and sometimes they get stronger with time. >> rose: and those emotions are. >> well, i think it has an extraordinary ability, this musical, to jog in your memory knowledge of your own grieves, your own disappointments, your own pains and somehow process these t
. thanks for joining us on this christmas day. merry christmas. we are keeping you updated on the latest news, also bringing christmas celebrations from around the world. a lot of people are getting something that was not on the christmas wish list. we are talking about the stormy weather. this is a powerful system that could dump 4 to 6 inches of snow and sleet on parts of southern great plains, the ozarks as well. the south is under the threat of severe weather and possible tornadoes. the storm already causing problems on the roads. the oklahoma highway patrol says westbound interstate 40 was temporarily shut down for two miles in a suburb of oklahoma city this morning. they say freezing rain is probably to blame for a chain reaction crash involving 20 vehicles. you see it there. including three big rigs. alexandra steele is the storm. >> take a look at this. severe weather is just beginning to ramp up today. we're looking at a whole day with severe weather. tornado watches you can see. look at this. i-10 right along the gulf coast, houston to new orleans. and this is just really the b
appreciate you smoothes, lifts, defies? red jars are all the same right? wrong! you need three uses of a $15 cream to equal the moisturizing power of one use of regenerist microsculpting cream. seems not all red jars are created equal. olay regenerist. ♪ here comes santa claus, here comes santa claus, right down santa claus lane ♪ >> it is a happy time. happy sweaters, and this is -- we don't know what's about to happen here. all we know is we have our own santa claus visiting. we have our own -- >> ho, ho, ho. merry christmas, boys and girls. merry christmas. yes, i am tired. i am all messed up here. i've just been running around. merry christmas, everybody. >> do you have presents for us, santa? >> oh, yes, i do! yes, i do. lots of presents. what would you like? back off, young man. back off! i said back off! >> that is beautiful. what is that, velvet? oh, my lord. >> i'm going to give you something really nice. yeah, that looks perfect. >> what else do you have? >> hey, here's a little mickey for you. >> oh, look at that, santa. >> this is for you. >> and a mug for you. >> i've alread
city for us tonight, thanks so much. >>> new details are emerging tonight about that christmas eve shooting of firefighters who responded to an emergency. it happened in western new york near rochester. police said today the convicted killer who drew them into his deadly trap left a note. here's nbc's ron mott. >> reporter: police say the christmas eve ambush of four firefighters battling a massive house fire in new york was spelled out by the suspected arsonist and shooter in chilling, typewritten detail. >> quote, i still have to get ready to see how much of the neighborhood i can burn down and do i like doing best, killing people. >> reporter: authority ts say 62 years william spengler, who served prison time for killing his grandmother more than 30 years ago, shot at first responders who arrived at his burning house, the fire spreading to six other homes. >> we are being shot at. multiple firemen down. i am shot. i think he's using an assault rifle. >> he was equipped to go to war to kill innocent people. >> reporter: the gunman was well-fortified with weapons and ammo. the sam
have always carried a little recording device of some sort. they used to be pretty big, but now they are quite small, and i always carry a pen and paper, and i am ready if something occurs to me. >> you mentioned merle travis. what other musicians? >> ry cooder is my favorite guitar player, but there are many others to choose from. there was an album that was a formative for me. "paradise and lunch." there was a guy coming up called tom rush who played here at the cellar door, and he played in boston at the 47. i really pattern myself after, just a guy with a guitar, full position, unapologetic. -- falcon musician. unapologetic folk musician. and i would say wouldtwo and the beatles. >> what do you think of current pop music? >> you know, i guess i do not like it a whole lot. [laughter] [applause] >> i guess i don't like it a whole lot. >> what would we find -- >> i sound just like my dad. there are great people out there, i know it. and i don't mean to condemn it but i think it's passed me by a little bit. i still have a wonderful career and a beautiful audience that i really l
to this story. >> what was amazing to us and what was relevant is the idea that nowhere on american television had a returning soldier returning from war been portrayed. and obviously in very circumstances in the case of our character, but that was something that really interested us but it felt like a good way to dramatize a lot of the questions we answered on "24" in a more knew answer fashion ten years after 9/11. a lot of questions that weren't clear then are even more complex now. what do we have to be afraid of? what's the price of our security? and these are the characters we created to ask those questions. >> and michael, with "the queen" what prompted that? decpwhrit came from another deal. it was a trilogy of films. the deal was a film made for british television about the supposed deal that was made between tony blair and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of
new book. he showed us his brain scan. >> it was no it leaving any part of my cortex unaffected. >> reporter: so your conclusion is because all of this outer area which is the higher functioning was covered with the infection, what you experienced in the coma wasn't part of the brain? >> right. >> reporter: many neuroscientists are kept couple arguing that his brain must have produced his visions somehow, most likely as he came out of coma. but something else happened. after he recovered, eben, who was adopted saw a picture of a sister from his biological family who died years ago, a woman he never knew. >> and i knew who my guardian angel was on the butterfly wing. it was the most profound experience i've ever had in this life. >> your sister by birth and from a family that you didn't know because you were adopted who died several years ago, who you had never met, you saw while you were in coma? >> yes. and that was the key. that explained everything. >> reporter: dinner time at the alexander home. they were not a particularly religious family before eben's coma. he was a skept
hathaway, warren buffett. he joined us on set along with carol lummis, who came out with the new book, "tap dancing to work: warren buffett on practically everything 1966 to 2012." a compilation about the oracle of omaha. >> what is the principle of warren buffett's life that keeps him who he is, but keeps him in his house and omaha. what's that thing in life that drove him in high school and drives him now? >> well, he does like to succeed, but money is nothing, absolutely nothing. he's always been driven and he got interested in invest, when he was -- well, his first trade was at age 11. i have four grandkids and none seem to be headed in that direction. and he just, he always was interested in every element of investing. >> so he had a goal. >> he had a goal. and you're right, he likes winning. you like winning, you like succeeded, but money, and i'm not just saying this patronizing, because most really rich people i know, money is something that comes along with doing something they love, right? >> absolutely. >> so for you, what was that thing that drove you from an early age? >> i got
has been tracking the storm for us. >> it's a little bit of everything. we are looking at a severe storm certainly possible. we've already had a tornado warning posted down through northern acadia parish in louisiana since lifted. but we are going to see more severe weather break out with a good chance of seeing some potential for tornados. we also have snow falling all across new england right now. heaviest in upstate new york. we still have the win themy mix back through the hartford area. we also stloe to keep an eye out for these storms where we do have a severe thunderstorm watch posted and eventually will see severe thunderstorm warnings get issued i'd say all across louisiana. all of those flashes of light, that's the cloud to ground lightning we're seeing. very strong storms back through louisiana and northeastern texas, as well. you go further north. we have winter weather warnings and advisories and watches basically from texas all the way up into northern new england and slowly going to see this thing start to spread eastward. however, for the gulf coast area, especially
and has put these bombs around the place. then sam jackson's character comes in and using torture and the whole film is about me being tortured by sam jackson and pushing you to see how far everybody concerned is prepared to go to get the information out of him. it was an incredibly difficult film to make for me. i remember one of the first days of the torture thing which is is something where i was chained to the ceiling and hosed down with water with fans blowing on me. and i said how are we going to do this and they said we're going to do it but not for very long. that set up a precedent for the hole film. that was a very frightening thing to go through. a point you brought up which is the idea that people's desire to be involved in helping the imaging of this completely depends on what they believe is how they are being portrayed in it. and that gets very complicated. >> it's a public they report they are trying to not to get in trouble. there are agencies who are better or less. >> i think mueller believed in the idea which he sort of watched the c.s.i. effect. c.s.i. created
. then sam jackson's character comes in and using torture and the whole film is about me being tortured by sam jackson and pushing you to see how far everybody concerned is prepared to go to get the information out of him. it was an incredibly difficult film to make for me. i remember one of the first days of the torture thing which is is something where i was chained to the ceiling and hosed down with water with fans blowing on me. and i said how are we going to do this and they said we're going to do it but not for very long. that set up a precedent for the hole film. that was a very frightening thing to go through. a point you brought up which is the idea that people's desire to be involved in helping the imaging of this completely depends on what they believe is how they are being portrayed in it. and that gets very complicated. >> it's a public they report they are trying to not to get in trouble. there are agencies who are better or less. >> i think mueller believed in the idea which he sort of watched the c.s.i. effect. c.s.i. created more interest in people going into coronaries
us. and i wanted to congratulate you on your national press award. this is the third time you won it. congratulations. >> i'm alina cho. i'll be back. >>> you know, dana bash is the -- she's good on capitol hill. good morning and merry christmas. >>> stories we're watching in the newsroom on this christmas day. pope benedict xvi tells people not to up hope even in the world's most troubled reasons. his appeal for peace. >>> and it's not the grinch stealing christmas cheer. it's the weather. blizzard warnings may turn your white christmas into a travel nightmare. and tornados threaten the south. your forecast is coming up. >>> and we're seven days away from going off the fiscal cliff and with washington in a political gridlock we're getting closer and closer. the question, how will it affect you and your paycheck? >>> the images, the words, the names, highlights and low lights of 2012. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning to you. i'm carol costello wishing you and yours a merry christmas and we begin with pope benedict xvi using his an i'll christmas message to speak about the h
are pleased to have you with us to consider this fateful history and its role in american politicized housing finance. after many years of dealing with and thinking about fannie mae i thought i knew a lot about this subject but i learned a lot more about it from reading bob's book, especially the very long-term evolution of politicized mortgage finance in this country and also about the vivid personalities involved over the last 40 years, all the way to the end of the story, at least it is the end so far. the book is full of information but in addition if you read my invitation to this event you know i think it represents an underlying tragic drama. in fact a shakespearean tragedy in five's. rise, power, hubris, fall, and other humiliation. on power, many people in washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid of fannie mae and the retribution it needed out to people who dared to cross it. on hubris, fannie often claiming it was the center of, quote, of the best housing finance system in the world. so ironically in retrospect, of course. t
's a reception outside we invite you to join us. hope you'll buy the book and have the autograph it. thank you on much to you and to our commentators. heart mark >> historical novelist said to focus on five families, american, english, german, russian and welsh as they traverse the political landscape with the second world war. this is just over an hour. >> thank you and good evening. you and i have never met until 10 minutes ago, but i have to say i feel as if i know you after so many years of reading your terrific books. you've given me and most of the people here tonight tremendous pleasure. as i think one critic from your book said being able to get lost in a wonderful story and come out days or weeks later feeling as if you've learned something. so you do both things i appreciate what you do so much. to make something like an historical trilogy. that is tiny little pieces. i learned on the cbs and is issued to journalism. is that true? >> is close to the truth, yes. my first job was university reporter in the south with echo, which is my hometown newspaper. and it worked for the london ev
been upon us was telling them they're wrong. but they had the extraordinary level of intellectually ability required to acknowledge the possibility that they were wrong in a profound sense. what is the evidence that would prove i'm wrong? so when they were wrong, because zoonosis rate of the time, they could change course as lincoln did many times during the civil war. >> host: that's a rare combination. >> guest: these are characteristics captured. >> host: we are wrapping it up quickly. we just had a presidential election. the winner he was president already so he's been filtered for four years, but mitt romney. was he extremely filtered? >> guest: unfiltered without a doubt. in historical is not a lot of time in politics. had he won the presidency, he would've been second second only to wilson and arguably grover cleveland in terms of the shortness of his political career before he became president. >> host: well, listen, thank you. this is a fascinating books. alexis totino, the toes he says he don't know about it. >> guest: thank you very much. the fact that was, but tv signatu
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)